It’s that time of year again…

I have signed up for the New Zealand Handmade Christmas Ornament Swap.

I signed up for the first time last year and enjoyed getting a surprise so much that I have decided to do it again.

Actually this year, now that life is more normal and settled for a change, I am considering making all my family home-made gifts. It might just be an ornament each or something more substantial depending on each person but I am starting to gather ideas, some I might be able to share (certain family members do blog-stalk me so I have to be careful, isn’t that right SIL-with-itchy-feet?)

Anyway, just a quick post to explain how it all works:

You sign up on the NZ Handmade page here, time is ticking, you have until October 28th. Then you get sent a swap partner and create your gorgeous ornament (plus handmade card) and post it away to them by November 30th – heaps of time! ;) They also post lost of ideas and tutorial links on the NZ Handmade page.

If you are interested, this is my swap from last year, pretty cool huh?

Ann’s Christmas ornament for me

My Christmas ornament for Ann (plus one for me, hehe!)

It’s open to all crafty bloggers all over the world so how about you join me? Maybe we’ll get each other!

The Craft & Textile Lover’s Guide to Wellington

(click for larger images)

I picked up this pamphlet when I was in Made on Marion the other day. I was trying to find a digital link to share with all my Wellington readers and potential Wellington visitors but there doesn’t seem to be one online…so I scanned it in for you guys instead.

I’m pretty sure that’s OK, it’s available for free in several stores around town.

We have some great fabric and crafty shops and the more that know the merrier I think.

I’ve also made a list with a few others that aren’t on this map.

Enjoy!

:)

Agapanthus – 1; The Curious Kiwi – 0

Guess what? This will be my 200th post, wow! :D I didn’t think when I started my little blog that I’d enjoy writing so much but I love it!

Thanks for following along xx

On Saturday we had a weather bomb* so I spent the day pottering in my room. I was in a quiet mood so I worked on the rugby jersey and managed to trace three dress patterns, one of which will be the “Birthday Dress” for 2012. On Sunday it was beautiful, in Wellington anyway, so I declared Gardening and I were BFFs 4EVA and decided it was time for Edible Garden: Stage One Extension.

Three more bags of compost was acquired from Bunnings and I dragged the wheelie bin around to the back and set to work.

First up, here is the next area to be cleared:

Oh my gosh, don’t look at the grass! This is before it got mowed, last weekend Nerdy Husband declared it needed to “grow out” a bit before the next mowing.

Recently there has been a healthy discussion in the sewing blogosphere around how much people dress up for, or alter, their garment photos in comparison to “real life” – honestly, if I knew how to make a lawn looked mowed in Photoshop I would have done it!

To give you a location based on the first bed, it is a bit further along the north fence-line and just as overgrown.

A rouge (and poorly Photoshopped) lawn mowers appears – it’s not very effective!

It is also a bit lower down and a bit more boggy, mostly due to the types of plants currently growing there, but nothing a bit of sand and compost won’t fix.

I was keen to clear at least half of it to start with, beginning with one offending mini-Agapanthus.

I don’t like Agapanthus.

I’m sorry if you do (actually, I’m not) but they annoy me and I don’t really know why. Kiwis (and the Aussies too) are so obsessed with planting them everywhere. The council stick them in our roundabouts, people line their driveways with them but to me they are a glorified weed and they are not to reside in my garden.

I know my dislike is irrational and I completely understand people disagreeing with me. Nerdy Husband feels the same way about hydrangeas for no good reason either. I don’t mind them actually, what’s to hate? They pretty much grow a complete bouquet on a stem, easy as. We have one in the front garden, I recognised it the other day when it started greening up after it’s winter sleep.

I”ll wait until it flowers to see how long until Nerdy Hubby notices it, a little marital experiment if you will, hehe ;)

Luckily, we do agree on the Agapanthus issue.

Does anyone else feel that way about Agapanthus? Just me? Or perhaps there is another plant you love to hate for no reason? It’s OK if you like Agapanthus, feel free to defend them in the comments.

There were a couple of green leafy things cowering in front of the Agapanthus, but I quickly dispatched them to the wheelie bin and soon there was nothing standing between me and the Agapanthus but soggy dirt.

It’s possible that I may have mentioned something out aloud to that blight in my garden…

…and it may have heard me.

It broke my fork :(

That’s just plain cheating!

I will admit that when I went and bought all my new garden toys a couple of weekends ago, that I did buy the cheapest fork in the shop. I wasn’t sure if Gardening and I were going to be friends so cheap and cheerful was the motto of the day.

This fork may have been a bit too cheerful.

I have two options: buy another one (more expensive/better quality), or perhaps convince Mechanical-Brother-in-Law to weld mine up. I think I may go with the latter to begin with. Mechanical-Brother-in-Law owes us a favour and he has a couple of those welding things, one of them will do it I am sure.

He’ll probably ask me what sort of metal it is…”cheap” is a metal isn’t it?

So that was my day of digging done for and I took my wrath out on the ivy instead.

I don’t hate the ivy but it does go all along that fence and around the corner. The stuff around the corner is safe, it camouflages the fence and I like that when I look out my lounge windows I see green with the hills in the background above. It makes my backyard look like it goes on forever. The ivy over the vege garden however will prevent me from growing and supporting taller veges like beans and peas etc. It will also be a mission to maintain and make a mess when I trim it.

I didn’t get as much cleared as I wanted, my bin filled up surprisingly quickly but that was fine because by then I was tired and sick of bugs jumping out at me. I did manage to salvage the chicken wire from underneath for future use, very recyclingable of me.

So I left my garden “extension” like this, not very cleared but with high hopes of hitting it again on the upcoming long weekend:

In other gardening adventure news we have had one casualty in the current garden bed, a thyme seedling has mysteriously shrivelled up and died, but the strawberries are doing amazingly well, including the one I rescued & divided. One of those even has new flowers (and that means strawberries will follow!) and I saw some bees humming around them too.  My gardening book says that strawberries are self pollinating but good pollination is essential for quality fruit so yay for bees!

I’ve been using my herbs carefully while they get established. Selective trimming of pieces for my cooking while encouraging bushy growth. Last night I made Spaghetti Meatballs flavoured solely from my baby herb garden and I swear it was the most delicious thing I have ever cooked!

Oh and look! Carrot & spinach seedlings! And since I took this photo the spinach has gone mental, they all have their first “real” set of leaves, you know, the ones that look like the actual finished plant:

I have a 100% strike rate on the Pak Choi (which apparently should be harvest-able in about 2 weeks, I find that hard to believe), a 50% strike rate on my beans which are growing very fast and I will need that garden bed ready for them soon.

If you look really close you can see one lonely leek seedling in the left hand most row, 4 cells back! Ohh!

I thought there was still nothing from either the celery or the leeks but I after looking at this photo I noticed a tiny lonely leek seedling, can you see it?

I read in the same gardening book that they can take between 21 days and a whole month to sprout! I also read in my book that I can actually plant a few of the other seeds I bought. I mis-read the packet: I read “plant indoors in winter…” aww but it’s spring, and I put it down…actually it goes on to say, “or early spring outdoors…” oops, I thought I had a longer attention span that that! So I have another mini plastic greenhouse now planted with cheery tomato, chili & capsicum, yay!

* Quick random rant: is weather “bomb” not the most over-used non-scientific meteorological term ever? I’m not trying to down play it, Auckland did get hammered by said “bomb” but weather peeps, if you want to be taken seriously can we have some science please? Science will always trump sensationalism!

RNHS: The Rugby Jersey Pattern

RNHS (Requested Nerdy Husband Sewing) may just become a bit of an irregularly regular series, see, I even made a new category for it ;)

My newest super-sewing-fan is keen for progress on his new rugby jersey so on a rainy Saturday I began by altering the pattern.

I started with a polo shirt from Burda 04/2007, #130 and I traced the largest size, which I knew instantly would be too small. Part of this is due to the slim fit of the pattern style I suspect, that’s a European thing, and Nerdy Husband is not into European fit.

“Yachting Style”

Anywho, I compared my pattern to the “favourite” shirt and still high from the last RNHS success I set to work altering it.

The “favourite” shirt – no real surprise there!

I’m sorry I forgot to take some before photos but after tracing onto some leftover drafting film I just got right into it.

You will notice I am working with a full pattern piece, as opposed to an “on the fold” piece, I have the space and it will help me line up the stripes I hope! I am also working with no seam allowances so I can match with the true stitching lines on the All Blacks shirt. I will add them on with chalk to the fabric before I cut.

First up we needed some length – 5cm worth to be exact, and then some width, 4cm (2 cm to each side). I simply slashed my pattern piece and added it in, using “yellow trace”, my favourite tracing medium. I also raised the bottom of the button placket to match.

I applied similar changes to the back:

Then I realised that the armhole is much more relaxed on the All Blacks shirt so I added another 2 cm into them, which then meant I needed to take 2 cm out from my previous length addition. No problem, I just folded that back to 3cm. I also added the 2cm into the sleeve and ‘walked it’ around the armhole to check the final length, perfect! Strange that there appears to be no ridiculous amount of sleeve ease in this pattern.

Lastly I added length to the sleeves and here are my final pattern pieces:

My eyes are not used to looking at men’s pattern pieces, the shape and the size are so different, so I’m still not 100% convinced that this is all going to work out but it’s worth a shot!

Last night I prepared to cut it all out:

After I took this photo I rotated the pattern pieces 180 degrees before some very careful lining up and cutting.

The fabric overall looks like just repeating blue and white stripes but in actuality there is an occasionally repeating wider dark blue stripe that has a thin light blue stripe running through it. I wanted this at mid-chest and below the button placket but I also still wanted dark blue at the shoulder and hem and I could only achieve this by turning it all around.

The occasionally repeating wide stripe doesn’t appear again within the shirts length, this is either on purpose by design or more likely a fluke. Either way it’s fine by me!

Adding seam allowances

Don’t tell Nerdy Hubby that I traced the seam allowance on with my pink chaco pen and using pink pattern weights ok? He was meant to be overseeing the whole cutting operation but was far too distracted playing with the blue chaco pen and trying to work out how the chalk came out of it to notice ;)

Scientists!

And that is as far as I got – tonight I’ll be playing with the sleeves, hoping to get dark blue at the hem and still line up the stripes at the shoulder. I also need to dig through the stash box for some white drill for the collar and button placket and Nerdy Husband has requested rubbery buttons.

“Rubber buttons?”

“Yes, all real rugby jerseys have rubber buttons.”

“Umm, ok then…”

A ‘Thank You’ Award

I was honoured to receive a blog award from Nikki, a fellow Wellington sewing blogger :)

This new blog award is a way to say a big thank you to the people who encourage you by commenting on your blog, it’s a great idea!

It’s pretty neat actually because just recently I have been trying to concentrate more on collecting interesting sewing blogs and doing my best to step up my commenting. I used to be a bit shy and lurk around my massive blog list. I relied almost solely on BurdaStyle for my on-line sewing interactions but I do that less and less now. Instead I have discovered I have much more fun interacting with all the blogs I follow, making comments if I like something or offering my humble opinion.

So thank you Nikki :)

For this blog award there is no requirement to do anything like list stuff about yourself, you just pass it on to the last nine bloggers to comment on your blog…well I’m going to cheat a little bit and choose the nine from my Birthday Dress Musings post (excluding those who have already been awarded) plus a couple of others because all of your comments were awesome and I really appreciated your opinions.

Thank you to:

Rachel of My Messings

Allison C

Sewing Elle

Jane’s Sew & Tell

SewSkateRead

Wendy of Sew Biased

Sewing Sveta

Zoe of ZoSews

Trish of Quiet Vintage Sewing

And a huge thank you to everyone else who has commented on any of my posts, let’s spread some more encouragement and sewing love around the blogosphere <3

PS: I traced and cut a pattern on the weekend for the Birthday Dress but I am going to keep my choice a secret for just a bit longer, you are welcome to have a guess ;) I am hoping to find the perfect fabric this week so I can start on the long weekend (Labour Day for us is this coming Monday, yay!)

Tutorial: Small thread spool holder for under $5.00

In my pre-blogging days I uploaded a couple of tutorials and patterns via BurdaStyle to share. In the next week or two I want to re-post these to my blog, because I can. I just sort of want them on my blog, you know? Then I can link to them more easily and they are here, under my control.

So first up is my tutorial for a thread spool holder I (mostly Nerdy Husband – but I did all the planning and supervising!) made while living in Perth, it cost less than AUD$5.00

From December 2009: OK so this isn’t technically sewing but I thought I might share anyway. I am lucky enough to have a small dedicated sewing room and I’m a bit of an organising geek but since we rent I can’t really put up permanent shelving or hang things off of the wall so I have to get imaginative. I also like to display my sewing items and keep them within easy reach so I’ve had this little project in mind for a while and thought I would document as I go to see if I can inspire someone else. I wanted to display my sewing threads in a nice manner and since I already have a pin board up I wanted to piggy back off of it some way…

Ingredients:

  • Length/s of dowel small enough to fit through a spool
    • Mine are 6mm in diameter – $0.87 each x 2 (0.6cm or 1/4″)
  • Length of timber to fit dowel to
    • I used a piece 30 x 12 x 900mm long – $3.07 (3 x 1.2x 90cm long or 1-3/16″ x 1/2″ x  35-1/2″)
  • PVA Glue
  • Drill and drill bit
  • Pencil and ruler
  • Helpful fiancé or similar

Method (to the madness):

Step 1

First mark a center line down your timber and mark the spacing for the dowels. I measured 4cm between centers; this allows my largest spools to sit side by side without touching.

Step 2

Now pre-punch your marked holes. We didn’t have a punch so we used an old screwdriver, and because my helpful fiancé is a geologist, a rockpick for a hammer.

Step 3

Now drill your dowel holes, mine are on a slight angle, about 45 degrees. Try and keep the angle and depth consistent.

Step 4

All holes drilled. Now clean up the mess and gently sand away any rough parts on the surface and inside the holes.

Step 5

Now cut your dowels. I cut mine 5cm long which allows enough to go into the base and still leaves enough for a spool to sit on without it showing. Clean up any rough ends.

Step 6

Now fill your drilled holes with a little PVA glue and begin to fit your dowels. Mine needed a little gentle persuasion. Clean up any glue that squirts out with a damp rag.

Step 7

I attached my spool holder to my pin board but you could make a larger stand alone one, or attach it to a shelf edge. I’m sure there are plenty more possibilities.

Totting Up:

Dowel: $0.87 x 2 = $1.74
Timber: $3.07
PVA Glue: from my stash – seriously, who doesn’t have some PVA at home?!
Husband’s Fee: Home-made Banana & Walnut Loaf

Total: $4.81

Since writing this I have added another row of spools below this one:

And on the weekend I added some small hooks underneath the bottom row, upside down, so that I can hang some of my current favourite patterns underneath using small bulldog clips. In the picture above I have them hooked over the dowel, underneath a spool of thread but every time I go to move them I keep dropping the spool of thread down behind my fabric shelving, haha. The hooks work much better!

And that’s it, I hope you have been inspired into a little bit of nerdy organisation ;)

Did you like this post? You may enjoy one of these:

Mission! Complete: Pressing Equipment

Tutorial: Visualising Fabric on Patterns – Part One (Photoshop)

Tutorial: Visualising Fabric on Patterns – Part Two (Gimp)

Birthday dress 2012 musings

So, now that I am properly settled in, it’s about time I started to think about this year birthday dress.

“The idea is that it can be a nice every-day kind of dress, or a completely unjustifiable and unnecessary dress and that’s ok, because it is the birthday dress and no excuses will be required.”

-kaitui_kiwi, 2011

It is so very late, but, start as you mean to go on, no??

Anyway, here are my thoughts for this year’s dress – Feel free to comment on your favourite, but as I am a bit flighty with my sewing queue (who isn’t?!) there are no promises it’ll even be a dress on this list ;)

Simplicity 1802 is from my most recent pattern splurge sale purchase. I LOVE it and wanted to make it straight away! I like the short sleeve version (also piping!) and I could definitely wear this to work in spring/summer and I can see a winter version too.

Vogue 1190 has been in my collection for a little bit and is very pretty. It is probably more of a “going out” dress for me, but you can never have too many of those. I like it in a print (check out Katherine’s version) but I think it would also make a gorgeous LBD.

I think I bought Vogue 1161 at the same time as the pattern above. I gushed about this as an option for last years dress (check out Tasia’s and The Slapdash Sewist’s versions!), there are plenty of other gorgeous versions online. I like the little cap sleeve and the flounce in the skirt back , this could also easily be a work or going-out dress.

Vogue 1265 is newish in the stash and very work appropriate. I love the collar, cap sleeves and full flouncy skirt at the back. It would look great in a suity looking pinstripe and is high up the sewing list either way.

Another new pattern, Butterick 5749, perhaps a quick and easy option (not to jinx it or anything!) to use up some jersey from my stash – I love Allison’s version.

One day when I am feeling brave I will give Vogue 1258 a go. Sometimes when I first see a pattern I think to myself, “That’ll never end up looking as good in real life” but I have seen some great versions (see Jessica’s and Allison’s versions, gorgeous!) and I think maybe I could pull it off, so I bought it!

A few other patterns I’ve had on my list for a bit: I’ve never made anything from Your Style Rocks but when I do this will porbably be the first pattern I try.

So what do you think? Is there one you want to add? Remember the Birthday Dress motto, “completely unjustifiable and unnecessary” is perfectly ok.

Did you like this post? You may enjoy one of these:

(Belated) Birthday Dress

Constructing, failing and saving the NSFW Dress (#12 Patrones 289)

Sewing a Foreign Language: Patrones Blouse #9