Rifle Paper Co La Sylphide

Have you ever had that feeling that you are the only person in the entire sewing universe that doesn’t own a particular fabric?

I give you the Cotton + Steel Rifle Paper Co. Les Fleurs Rayon Challis, Birch Floral in Navy:

Last year it felt like EVERYONE had this fabric and the more I saw it the more I wanted it too.

So I caved.

I don’t blame anyone, this challis is so silky and drapey. And as far as I was concerned there was only one pattern in my stash that was perfect for it.

I’ll give you a hint:

Why stop at five La Sylphides when I could have six?

I cut this one out in April but it took me a little while to finish.

2018 was The Year of Distracted Sewing. I started many projects and kept getting drawn into more new projects, putting the most recent one aside for a few months at a time. I think an early winter shelved this dress until I finally found some focus in the second half of the year.

I’m not suggesting I’ve stopped getting distracted in 2019, oh no, I’m still all over the place with my sewing decisions but so far this year I have at least been finishing things! 😉

I found the perfect matching coral buttons at Pete’s Emporium.

The Papercut La Syphide was a great choice for this pretty flowing fabric and I really love the colour combo on me. In fact this is one of my favourite makes of all time and I love wearing it.

The Wellington wind loves it too!

It will work great with tights in winter too.

I took these photos in Spring just as our Kowhai tree was reaching peak flower.

I love this tree, even if it does make a huge mess. we’re so lucky to have such a large, mature tree in our backyard.

Here’s a close up of the bell-shaped flowers.

The Tui flock from everywhere to drink the nectar. They’re loud, boisterous birds with very unique calls. Some days I lose count just trying to gauge how many are in the tree.

By October all the flowers are gone and the whole tree looks a little dead, all bare branches and brown seed pods but it’s not long until it’s lush and green again with new leaves.

Here’s to new beginnings!

THE DETAILS:

Pattern –Papercut Patterns La Sylphide dress, straight size S

Skirt lengthened approx 16cms, side seams taken in 1.5cm at the waist

Next time I’ll try an XS

Fabric – Cotton + Steel Rifle Paper Co. Les Fleurs Rayon Challis, Birch Floral in Navy

Other notions – Interfacing, thread, buttons from Pete’s Emporium

Previous versions of this pattern –

Like a motorbike? The Pfaff 332-260

The Pfaff 332-260 came from Wainuiomata in a cardboard box and later that day it was joined in the boot by a Brother.

It was, of course, filthy.

The machine hasn’t been inside it’s own suitcase for many years, the zipper seized shut.

The jewel of an original manual that the seller was so excited to offer with the machine is water damaged and many of the pages are stuck together.

Two of the dials are seized and while others move with force they do so unhappily.

She cost me $18.50 and she needs some work.

The top cover came off easily revealing all the little fingers and internal dials that work the stitches.

And the years of grime.

Just a little TLC made an improvement but there is still work to be done.

I have a service manual with beautiful diagrams like this:

Inside the tin were some things that belonged and others that definitely did not.

Umm, a shuttle?

I love her little collapsible table that reveals the free-arm when stowed.

It has a clip on extension.

She’s from the 1960s and I’ve been looking for one ever since someone told me they were “chain-driven, like a motorcycle”.

It’s not exactly a chain but the timing and drive belts are really interesting and unlike anything I’ve seen before. They’re multi-stringed and held together with metal cleats which slot into the grooves in the sprockets, driven by a 30-watt electric motor.

I’ve read it’s very hard to find replacements.

Along with the manual there should have been a double sided stitch dial card that revealed the dial positions for a vast array of embroidery stitches.

I easily found a pdf of the card online, there are 80 stitches in total. On my to-do list sometime I will print it off and make a working copy of it.

While working on this machine I kept thinking, “this must be the heaviest VSM I own by far!” and that got stuck in my head so much so that I decided I’d have to check.

So I got out my highly accurate (not) scales and decided to fat shame all those lumps of metal and the plastic ones too. Here’s how it shook out:

Brother 190: 15kg
Singer 99K-13: 13kg
Apollo HA-1 Generic: 13kg
Pfaff 332-260: 11kg
Bernina 125: 9kg
Singer 348: 9kg
Bernina 1150MDA: 8kg
Janome 1000cpx: 8kg
Elna One: 6.5kg
Elna 2130: 6kg
Singer Featherweight: 5kg
Harriet for reference: 4kg

The Pfaff is not the heaviest, easily beaten by the Brother 190 boot buddie, a half-sized Singer and it’s clone. All the modern machines are in the middle between 6kgs and 8kgs.

And no surprises for the lightest, living up to it’s name.

And because I put something down on the floor and paid close attention to it of course the Sewing Cat wanted to play as well.

It’s no use arguing with a cat.

Meet the rest of my VSM collection here.

More photos of the Pfaff here.

 

Sewing for Christmas and babies, part three: 2018

I promised you cake and cake you shall have! Sewing will also follow later in this post.

My nephew Harvey has his first birthday in September 2018 and I was asked to help with food. I offered to make the cake because I had an idea and if I’m helping with something it should at least be fun for me too.

(I’m sure if I didn’t mention it you wouldn’t even notice but please ignore the lack of splash back in my kitchen. I finally chose tiles the following month but of course they had to come from far far away and didn’t arrive until late December. They’re actually being installed as you read this!)

I began the night before the party with Sally’s Baking Addiction Easy Homemade Funfetti Cake (a new recipe for me that turned out to be delicious) and some sketches…

I didn’t really have enough hands to take progress pictures but here it is crumb coated the morning of the party.

I used the Chelsea Basic Butter Cream Icing recipe for the crumb coat and the final icing.

Some blue food colouring, smarties and pink wafer biscuits later…

And here it is at the party with all the other food:

The one year old babies didn’t seem impressed but I was really happy and the adults loved it.

Ok, sewing!

For Christmas 2018 I added to my nephews Christmas decoration collection. To follow on from the cake success I decided a festive dinosaur would be appropriate.

Anything can become festive with the addition of a Santa hat.

My sister said when they opened it on Christmas day H tried to eat it which apparently is a good sign.

Nerdy Husband also liked the festive stegosaurus so our tree got one too.

I made one other decoration for 2018, inspired by this Etsy listing.

Except for the stitching on the dial I think this one is mostly glued together. It felt a bit weird to use glue for a sewing machine ornament so I kind of did my own thing…

Oh and when I said “one more”, I actually meant three…

One for me and one each for two fabulous ladies I know.

I’ve had these tiny wooden cotton reels in my “I don’t know what I’m going to do them but I have to buy them” pile for a while. They were the perfect size.

I did tack the paperclip “needles” and bamboo kebab skewer “thread spools” in place with some glue.

I formed the flywheel around a bit of cardboard and stitched the sides. A large bead helped me attach it with thread.

I didn’t think about the weight of the thread spool so the hangers ended up needing to be under them for the machines to hang level.

Pretty cute, huh?

They look good on our Christmas trees too!

THE DETAILS:

Pattern – 

Fabric –  Felt from my stash

Other notions – DMC Stranded Cotton, ribbon, miniature wooden thread spool, bamboo kebab skewer, paperclip, beads

Sewing for Christmas and babies, part two: 2018*

*This time with no Christmas because I’ve realised this needs to be a three-parter so that’s stuffed up my post titles. Stick with me, Part Three does have Christmas…and cake.

In June of 2018 J, who I work with and was a few weeks away from going on Parental Leave, approached me shyly in the photocopier room. Her sister had given her their old Baby Björn Bouncer frame but had lost the cover. She had found a pattern on Etsy and was wondering if she bought it would I be able sew one up for her for payment.

I took a look at the link she had on her phone, the “pattern” cost just over $12.00 which kind of offended me. Maybe I’m over-reacting and perhaps this isn’t how it went down, but if you’re going to trace a pattern off something existing, don’t go and sell it to people for $12.00 (I’ve bought physical copies of complex designer Vogue patterns for a fraction of that), it’s just rude.

I really like J, she’s a real sweetheart and I was secretly flattered that she approached me. I also couldn’t take her money. I was excited to make something for her future little girl and also up for the challenge. I told her if she bought and pre-washed the fabric I would happily make it as my gift to her. But I also told her not to buy the Etsy pattern, “Leave it to me”…

I went back to my computer and found a free version within 30 seconds. I downloaded it and printed it off and went to show J. I explained that I wanted to test the pattern by assembling the paper pieces first and then I would work out how much fabric she would need to buy. We talked about what fabrics would be appropriate and where to buy the cutest prints from.

The pattern is by Twee emmerkes water, you’ll find the pattern here.

So not only is this pattern free but the author even checked with Baby Björn that it was ok for her to share it on her sewing blog. Perfect.

It’s hand drawn but is well laid out, has all the notches marked and includes a test square so you can check printer scale. There is also a layout plan of how the sheets go together on the last page. It could use a few numbered notches to help you work out which piece attaches to which but it’s not that tricky to work out. I’ve paid money for much worse.

I assembled the pages that night and drew up the extra pieces as described (see the tracing paper pieces to the right in the second photo).

I read over the instructions and added the names to each piece which are only numbered. Then I “sewed through it in my head” and it looked promising.

The only thing I couldn’t find was an accurate seam allowance. The instructions say “Sew on pressure foot width” but sewing feet come in lots of different widths…I walked the seams of a few of the pattern pieces, one pairing suggested 0.5cm and another suggested 1cm and since this is all hand drawn I shrugged my shoulders and sewed with a seam allowance of 0.7cm which is a bit less than my current presser foot width.

Apart from the loose seam allowance suggestion I only found one real error in the instructions. Step C: Assembling the front states, “Place the belt between the markings on piece 3, with right sides together.” – there are no markings on piece 3, there are on piece 2 but as far as I could tell from photos this is not where the belt should be attached, as this is the back seam of the seat area. I decided that the belt should be attached to piece 3 as instructed and relocated the notch from piece 2 to the front edge of piece 3.

Picture for clarity:

While I’m at it, if your belt is different fabrics inside and out then the wrong side (or inside) of the belt should be against the right side of piece 3. I’ve got photos coming up, don’t worry, you got this! 😉

The pieces lined up more or less with J’s measurements too.

So I messaged J, “great success” and because we’d discussed making the bouncer in two fabrics I told her to buy 1.2 meters of the main fabric (112cm wide quilting cotton) and 40cm of contrast.

You guys, she bought The. Cutest. Fabric. Ever.

Numbats!

I actually died when she showed me. So cute.

The contrast fabric is grey with Japanese styled clouds which you’ll see later. Both fabrics were a little on the thin side however nothing some over-zealous interfacing with an ElnaPress couldn’t fix.

I did some tests first and went with the thickest stuff I own. I’ve had this in my stash for ages. A remnant from when I was learning to sew and just starting to use interfacing. I bought some that was way too thick. It was really great to finally have a use for it!

Next I cut out very carefully so that I didn’t decapitate any numbats.

The original pattern calls for buttons on bias tape ribbons to hold the belt. I’m a bit nervous when it comes to babies and buttons (nothing smaller than a film canister I remember being told…people don’t even know what film canisters are these days right?). So I went with some red hammer-on snaps from my stash that match the highlights in the fabric perfectly. I told J I would swap them out for something more robust if she felt the closure wasn’t strong enough.

In fairness to the author, the instructions do say, “Use big buttons (1 inch diameter) and attach them firmly to the ribbons…Do not forget to check the buttons regularly, especially after every machine wash.”

Always sign your work

Everything went together smoothly, all pieces lined up well.

Here is the belt stitched to the front edge of piece 3, I would call this the seat bottom.

All the seams are sewn and then overlocked so that I can be machine washed. It really didn’t take very long to make, maybe two hours tops. I probably spent more time interfacing than sewing.

I had fabric left over because J bought extra. I tried for a while to piece out a small dress but there wasn’t quite enough. I ended up making 3 dribble bibs, a basic triangle with a button hole at one corner to poke the other end through. I forgot to take a photo of these.

I wrapped everything up and gave it to J promising I would make adjustments to the cover if it didn’t fit the frame. It looked so good and I was really nervous. I’d shunned the paid pattern for a freebie and assumed the seam allowance, but guess what…

It fitted perfectly!

I was so relieved and it looked really cute on the frame.

The belt seems to be located correctly and below you can also see the “ribbons” I made for the other side of the hammer-on snap fastening.

Want to see something even cuter?

Aww! Hello baby E, stealing the cuteness from the numbats! ❤

THE DETAILS:

Pattern – Soft balance baby bouncer pattern

Fabric – Cottons from Spotlight (selected by J)

Other notions – Heavy interfacing, hammer-on snaps, cute baby (by J)

Sewing for Christmas and babies, part one: 2017

I saw this meme somewhere, it made me smile, you might also relate to it:

I don’t make New Years Resolutions but I am kind of over being behind with my blogging! So to get me started this, and the next post, are going to cover a lot 🙂 and then hopefully the writing keeps happening because I do miss it.

In late 2017 I was to become an Aunty and to welcome my nephew into the world I wanted to make him a soft toy.

I had in my head this photo of me and my little sister beside a huge Pink Panther toy. She’s still fairly brand new which puts me a 3 & 1/2 years old. I’m not sure if this photo was supposed to be part of a series but I like the idea.

On Etsy I discovered DIY Fluffies and accidentally bought 6 patterns including this ridiculously gorgeous Giraffe that I liked so much I decided I had to copy the fabric choice as well.

Apologies in advance that a lot of these photos were taken at night time on my old phone.

Note the beautifully illustrated instructions.

I picked up the brown and yellow spotty cottons from Spotlight and all the felt I had in my stash.

The pattern comes as a single A4 file with two pages of instructions and two of the pattern pieces, one of which you need to print twice. The instructions suggest cutting out the pattern pieces then drawing around them on to the fabric while adding your 1cm seam allowance. I added my seam allowance to the paper pieces instead before cutting out. They also say “seam allowance doesn’t have to be very precise” but on such small pieces I disagree.

I really enjoyed making this little cutie but it did come with it’s fair share of challenges.

First of all the tail was the hardest piece to turn! It’s so narrow and getting past the join between tail and tip was almost impossible…I’m not sure how I’d try it next time…maybe catching a long thread in there while assembling so that I’d have something to pull through the tail, like how a bodkin works, to get it started.

The ossicones (dictionary lesson: that’s what giraffe antlers are called, I checked. Try and use it in a sentence later today) were only slightly easier.

But if I thought the tail was hard, that was nothing compared to the tiny hoofs!

Pinning them enough to get a smooth sewing line and then trying to fit them under the machine foot was so difficult. Sewing black at nighttime didn’t help either. I used a narrow foot but I still had to unpick all the little caught sections so many times!

My favourite part of this pattern is how the legs come together. They have a gusset which means all four legs end up independent and tubular. The giraffe stands sturdily on it’s own, it’s quite clever.

The head was a breeze.

The ears get caught in the horizontal seam at the back of the head but the ossicones are stitched onto the head surface. I stitched these on pretty securely but part of me is still a little worried. Next time I’d add a second horizontal seam so they could get sewn in similar to the ears and work out a way to get them to stand upright.

Overall I’m pretty proud of this little cutie. A few tricky bits but ultimately it was worth it and fun to see it take shape so quickly.

It took A LOT of stuffing and the final giraffe is 37cm tall.

Here it is with my nephew H. I’m not sure how old he is in this pic, he still looks pretty new but he has found his smile 🙂

I actually made two of these giraffes simultaneously. So now you understand why I emphasised the the tail and feet issues, they were doubled for me!

A good friend of mine J was expecting a couple of months before my sister so it made sense to double down and make giraffes for all.

P loves his Giraffe too:

As well as a giraffe for H I also started a tradition of making and sending a Christmas decoration each year. I find the endless plastic toy adverts that bombard us leading up to Christmas so disgusting that I wanted to make something a bit more meaningful. It later years I’ll start adding educational toys or books to accompany them.

For his first ever Christmas I thought a stocking would make perfect sense.

I sketched out the pattern myself and even had a go at some hand sewn lettering.

It’s basically to layers that I decorated first. These were then sewn together with a white rectangle folded over the top. You can’t access the inside of the stocking.

I’m not sure how he’ll feel when he gets to 18 and has 18 handmade ornaments from his crazy Aunty. Hopefully he appreciates them…eventually…we’ll see 😉

THE DETAILS:

Pattern –

Fabric – 

  • Cottons from Spotlight and my stash
  • Felt from my stash

Other notions – Hobby fill, buttons, DMC Stranded Cotton, ribbon

 

 

Evernote and Pattern Cataloging

I’ve written before about using Evernote for organising my patterns so that I can access them anywhere. I also briefly reviewed the Android app. Lately I’ve had a few people ask me in real life about organising patterns and so I thought maybe I’d write an update.

Evernote has a great help page to get you started and of course, you can Google anything…so this isn’t really a tutorial per say, more of an, “this is how I use it and I think it’s great”.

So first of all, an Evernote Basic account is free to use on up to two devices with a monthly upload limit of 60Mb – trust me, you’ll be sick of entering pattern information by the time you hit that limit and happy to wait for the month to roll over I’m sure! If you’re not, or you use Evernote for loads more things, like me, then a Premium plan is worth it.

I began by using Evernote just for sewing patterns but now I have a work specific notebook, notebooks for planning holidays etc and one for all my recipes. That means I need access on my phone, my PC, my work Mac and my tablet, so Premium is my jam.

Ok let’s just jump right in then:

Here is my view on my PC. I can’t comment on Mac because I log in through the web browser at work and later I’ll show you some Android app screen shots. Sorry if you are a Mac person, well, not really 😉

On the left are my notebooks (some of them are nested), think of them as the top level folder and inside them are the files (the notes). All my sewing pattern notes live in my Patterns notebook (that makes sense right?). They are in there all together in a jumble – there is no separate notebook for pants and another one for dresses etc because the way you search is by using Tags.

I tag my patterns the way I would search for them – by brand, type of garment and sometimes more specific thing like, “Vintage/Retro” and “Festive” as examples.

I also have a tag called “Queued” so that I can find my shortlisted pattern even more quickly. (In my recipes notebook I use the tags “Planned” and “Favourites”)

Here is a note. Under the note name is the notebook (where the note lives) and it’s tags:

You can keep your tags under control by grouping them. I have two groups for my sewing patterns: Pattern Category (type of garment, e.g. “Pants”) and Pattern Designer (e.g. Butterick”)

In the first image you’ll also see tag groups for my Recipes and Fabric notebooks. I’m still deciding if I want to keep my Fabric notebook, it’s a lot of admin for how little I access it!

I really enjoy “shopping” my stash in real life 😉

I keep it pretty simple but you could tag for seasons or fabric type, pdf versus print or Big 4 and Indie, whatever you want, however you think you’ll search for a pattern.

Notes themselves can go on forever, you can type or insert pretty much anything.

Let’s look at the full note from the above example:

So much information at my finger tips – and how did I get it? I copied it from the Butterick website, easy! You can also put in photos (for vintage or OOP patterns) and the most powerful thing about Evernote is you can search inside your notes. All the text, whether typed, copied, photographed, or even in a PDF, is searchable.

So, to stick with this example: I want to find a dress pattern, so I’ll look in my Sewing Patterns Notebook at all notes tagged with “Dresses”…I might even know I want it to be a Big 4 pattern, so I can also look at all the Butterick, McCall’s etc tags. Or maybe I just know I want a vintage dress, I can look at notes tagged with “Vintage/Retro” AND “Dresses”.

While I’m searching I can order my results by “title” (the way I title my notes means I’ll see them in brand order) or “created” (to see patterns by order they were entered which for me means date purchased)

Let’s look at how it appears in the app, when I’m at the fabric store holding the most beautiful bolt of fabric that’s also on sale and I just need to check how much to buy:

Looking at a specific tag:

These examples are ordered by date, I forgot to change my settings for the screenshots.

Maybe it’s a bolt of denim, hmm, what pants can I make with this?

You’ll notice in the above tags list you can see some of my Recipe tags, that’s one of two annoying things I’ll mention later…and here are two example of full notes:

I copy my favourite pictures from the pattern website and often the text description (good for searching). I also grab the line drawings and fabric chart. If it’s a brand I don’t sew from regularly I also copy and paste the size chart/finishes measurements chart as well. I also have a Size Charts Notebook and I’m experimenting with linking notes to their brands size chart but often it’s easier to look it up or paste it into the note itself. I keep my current body measurements in a note here as well.

For the Acton Dress I also included a screenshot from Instagram of a version I love:

I have a “Wishlist” notebook for patterns I want to buy but I’m waiting for payday…or a sale…or I think I like but I want to see more versions before I commit. It’s easy to move notes between notebooks so once I buy a pattern from my Wishlist I move it to the main Patterns notebook, adding in anymore information and tags.

In the interests of total honesty (and to prove I’m not being paid for this post, I wish!) there are two things I find annoying and that I hope one day will get fixed. The first is only mildly annoying but it’s that tags are not associated with a Notebook. What that means is that as I’m writing a new note and I want to tag it for example “Cardigan”, all the other possible tags pop up as I type.

Mmmm, Chicken patterns…this list whittles down as you type more letters but I wish it would only show the Tags for Patterns.

The second thing is much more annoying. It’s that you can’t choose which image shows as the thumbnail in your notes list. This is strongly and regularly complained about in the Evernote forums. What this means is that I can’t guarantee the hero image, the image I paste in first, the image I want to see, is displayed in the notes list, see example:

No consistency at all. Well there is, through some weird algorithm that picks the image with the smallest biggest measurement or something equally absurd sounding. It’s actually one more reason why I paid for Premium, to lend more weight to the many requests to allow us to control this.

Anyway, I don’t want to end on a bad note. It’s not stopped me from continuing to use Evernote and I’ll stick with it for the foreseeable future. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve pulled out my phone in the fabric shop or at someone’s house or at work, to show someone a pattern. I also look up recipes while out food shopping!

I use my tablet in the kitchen when I’m cooking and for work I have a notebook with all my technical notes and software tutorials. I also planned our recent overseas holiday with Evernote, sharing the notebook with Nerdy Husband. I had notes for each city we visited with lists of attractions and our accommodation details. I also uploaded all our important pdfs and scans of important documents (tickets, booking confirmations, health insurance, passports etc) so that I could access them on the fly or in an emergency.

So, that’s it. Any questions? Suggestions, tips or tricks? Do you catalog your patterns and if so, what do you use?

Mysterious Attachments – Brother 190B Super Flairmatic

I love to share my sewing machine collection with you but please note, I am an amateur vintage sewing machine collector, I do this for fun – Please do not ask me to help you value your machine or buy/help you sell it. I also will not respond to requests for advice relating to repair or restoration beyond what I have written about. None of my machines or accessories are for sale and I do not give away, lend or sell my manuals, scanned or otherwise, for free or for any sort of payment/trade. Thank you 🙂

The Brother 190 Super Flairmatic came home with me from the Kapiti Coast, with a friend. This is becoming a common occurrence.

Actually the Pfaff got picked up second, from Wainuiomata, about 60 kilometers in the opposite direction. More about her in my next VSM post.

It was a beautiful day for a drive!

I had no clue about this machine when I first saw it, I just loved the colour and 1950sness. She was only $15.00 and look what she came with:

Ohh, a mysterious tin, I love a mysterious tin! I wonder if there’s anything inside?!

Lots of things!

And this weird thing, which we’ll come back to shortly:

She was also absolutely filthy.

They almost always are.

How do they never look as dirty in the online photos? My enthusiasm always dips a little and then I get to work.

So shiny!

Much better!

If you google “Brother 190B Super Flairmatic” you get a lot of pictures. They look just like my machine, in different colours. Mmm, beige…

You’ll also see a 1960s advert from the Sydney Morning Herald for the Lemair-Helvetica Flairmatic Automatic Zig-Zag.

Sensational.

I’m never sure which re-badged machines are legit and which are not…

Anyway, what you’ll not see (or at least I haven’t seen yet) in those Google images is this:

Located just behind the presser foot…it opens up too:

Neat huh? What could it be for? It looked familiar but had me stumped for a while so I kept cleaning and taking photos.

She didn’t come with a manual and all the pdf manuals I’ve seen online show nothing behind the presser foot:

Then my brain woke up and suggested I pull out my vintage Singer buttonhole foot.

Let’s take a look underneath:

Right?!

So I dug back out that weird blue packet from the tin of goodies and it clicked:

It makes buttonholes!

And then I couldn’t get the other half of the cam back out! I struggled for a bit until I took a closer look at the rest of the pieces. Of course it came with a tool for that:

Little tabs and recesses, I was nerding out big time. This is the perfect example of why I love vintage machines and their accessories. It’s ridiculously simple but next-level clever.

I haven’t successfully sewn a button hole just yet. The drive belt was perished and despite coming with a spare Brother branded belt, it’s the wrong size. That’s on my list for the next parts order and I’ll be back to update you.

While investigating further I found an example of a Kenmore buttonholer set on eBay. It has a replacement needle plate featuring a similar cog and full length cams.

I’ve also since seen two more examples of this machine owned by other NZ/Aus collectors in the same colourway and with the buttonhole cog. Neither of those machines came with the accessories and while one lady managed to find a set the other is still looking. So this was clearly an option available for this machine but perhaps only for some markets and only for a brief period of time.

Have you even seen this kind of built-in attachment before?

And that is my Brother 190B Super Flairmatic. As per usual I took too many photos which you can find here. More VSM stories are on my Vintage Sewing Machine page.