Tutorial: Small thread spool holder for under $5.00

In my pre-blogging days I uploaded a couple of tutorials and patterns via BurdaStyle to share. In the next week or two I want to re-post these to my blog, because I can. I just sort of want them on my blog, you know? Then I can link to them more easily and they are here, under my control.

So first up is my tutorial for a thread spool holder I (mostly Nerdy Husband – but I did all the planning and supervising!) made while living in Perth, it cost less than AUD$5.00

From December 2009: OK so this isn’t technically sewing but I thought I might share anyway. I am lucky enough to have a small dedicated sewing room and I’m a bit of an organising geek but since we rent I can’t really put up permanent shelving or hang things off of the wall so I have to get imaginative. I also like to display my sewing items and keep them within easy reach so I’ve had this little project in mind for a while and thought I would document as I go to see if I can inspire someone else. I wanted to display my sewing threads in a nice manner and since I already have a pin board up I wanted to piggy back off of it some way…

Ingredients:

  • Length/s of dowel small enough to fit through a spool
    • Mine are 6mm in diameter – $0.87 each x 2 (0.6cm or 1/4″)
  • Length of timber to fit dowel to
    • I used a piece 30 x 12 x 900mm long – $3.07 (3 x 1.2x 90cm long or 1-3/16″ x 1/2″ x  35-1/2″)
  • PVA Glue
  • Drill and drill bit
  • Pencil and ruler
  • Helpful fiancé or similar

Method (to the madness):

Step 1

First mark a center line down your timber and mark the spacing for the dowels. I measured 4cm between centers; this allows my largest spools to sit side by side without touching.

Step 2

Now pre-punch your marked holes. We didn’t have a punch so we used an old screwdriver, and because my helpful fiancé is a geologist, a rockpick for a hammer.

Step 3

Now drill your dowel holes, mine are on a slight angle, about 45 degrees. Try and keep the angle and depth consistent.

Step 4

All holes drilled. Now clean up the mess and gently sand away any rough parts on the surface and inside the holes.

Step 5

Now cut your dowels. I cut mine 5cm long which allows enough to go into the base and still leaves enough for a spool to sit on without it showing. Clean up any rough ends.

Step 6

Now fill your drilled holes with a little PVA glue and begin to fit your dowels. Mine needed a little gentle persuasion. Clean up any glue that squirts out with a damp rag.

Step 7

I attached my spool holder to my pin board but you could make a larger stand alone one, or attach it to a shelf edge. I’m sure there are plenty more possibilities.

Totting Up:

Dowel: $0.87 x 2 = $1.74
Timber: $3.07
PVA Glue: from my stash – seriously, who doesn’t have some PVA at home?!
Husband’s Fee: Home-made Banana & Walnut Loaf

Total: $4.81

Since writing this I have added another row of spools below this one:

And on the weekend I added some small hooks underneath the bottom row, upside down, so that I can hang some of my current favourite patterns underneath using small bulldog clips. In the picture above I have them hooked over the dowel, underneath a spool of thread but every time I go to move them I keep dropping the spool of thread down behind my fabric shelving, haha. The hooks work much better!

And that’s it, I hope you have been inspired into a little bit of nerdy organisation 😉

Did you like this post? You may enjoy one of these:

Mission! Complete: Pressing Equipment

Tutorial: Visualising Fabric on Patterns – Part One (Photoshop)

Tutorial: Visualising Fabric on Patterns – Part Two (Gimp)

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2 thoughts on “Tutorial: Small thread spool holder for under $5.00

  1. I love your spool holder. I want to make one that also stores my bobbins with the matching thread. I think if I use a thinner dowel I can put the bobbin under the thread. What do you do?

    • Hi Marcy, thanks! 🙂 After readin your comment I did a little test and my bobbins fit over that sized dowel too so I guess you could make the dowels a bit longer, so they poke out past the end of the spool, and store the bobbin on top of the matching thread? Or even just make two rows, one for bobbins, one for thread spools. I actually store my bobbins in a bobbin box and just unwind, rewind as needed. I keep black and white always wound of course but if it is a strange colour after I am finished I might wind it back on the spool. Sometimes I even wind a colour on top of another, my mum does that so I copy her, hehe.

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