“Up, up and away!”, it rhymes with Laneway

Finished items I’ve yet to blog about:

“New” Vintage Sewing Machines I’ve yet to blog about:

  • Bernina 125
  • Brother 190 Flairmatic
  • Pfaff 332-260
  • 1880s (?!) Beale and Company Handcrank transverse shuttle (possibly a rebadged Frister and Rossman)
  • 1910 Singer 15k treadle in no. 22 Drawing Cabinet

Items I’m supposed to have finished already:

  • Resignations Coat (Pauline Alice Quart Coat)…but I was waiting on new zippers to match my buttons. They finally arrived last week courtesy of the double slackness that is Australia and New Zealand Post.
  • Secret present (2 of 2)

Two of those lists are quite long…so obviously I’m blogging about none of those things today! 😉

For a while I used to pattern test regularly for Sewaholic and Papercut patterns. Pattern testing has had a bit of a rough time lately because, well, if you know why, then you know why…I really enjoyed pattern testing for these two brands only because both designers actually listened to my (and others) honest feedback about fit, instructions, etc…and incorporated these into the final release. I don’t pattern test for either designer anymore and I’ve missed it a little bit so I was excited when Jennifer Lauren announced she was looking for pattern testers and her reasons behind it. I signed up, it’s nice to help support a fellow Kiwi designer. I like her style but I’ve never sewn one of her patterns before…

Ok, that’s enough of an explanation. I was chosen for the first month of pattern testing for recently released The Laneway Dress. I was very excited because I really liked the look of the pattern when it came out.

I picked my fabric first, even before I got the pattern in my inbox 🙂

I pulled out a few options from my stash: Three are fun “quilting” cottons and you’ll notice the rayon that everyone else in the blogosphere also owns. I dismissed that as too light-weight and settled on the balloon girls because I love them and with the asymmetrical collar option it would be fun to play with the solid colours for the facing.

I tested out a few options and settled on red…although pink came close.

The Pattern:

With access to a large format printer it’s been a while since I’ve printed a pattern on A4 sheets but I decided to go old school to thoroughly test the process. Real-job has been a bit crazy lately, sometimes assembling and tracing patterns can be relaxing, methodical work.

The layout page was really helpful with both the test box and a full layout of the entire file nicely organised by pattern cup and piece which made printing really easy. However now is the perfect time to point out the 2 sheets that contained nothing but two little triangles of the skirt edge, in sizes I wasn’t even going to use…It’s only two sheets and I know this happens because the process of creating an A4 paged file is automated but to turn this into some constructive criticism I have a suggestion that I hope to one day to see implemented:What if the little corner bits were added to a page that had a bit more room? Both of the sheets (page 51 and 60) could have fitted on this sheet.

Ok, let’s move on with a game of Spot The Kitty Toes…also if you regularly assemble PDF patterns and don’t have a paper-cutter go and get yourself one right now…I’ll wait 😉

I chose my size from the finished garment measurements chart in the instructions and double checked by comparing the bodice pieces pattern to another favourite pattern. Then I selected my cup size by measuring my full and under bust as suggested in the instructions.

The instructions:

Really nicely laid out with clear diagrams. I like how each new section of the process is headed up on a new page and numbered clearly. I don’t print my instructions, I view them on my tablet, so I have no issue with the layout being clearly spaced out if it adds clarity.

I also think it’s great that stay stitching and finishing cues are included. Lots of seam allowance reminders and little tips spread throughout without being too hand-holdy and bogging down the more experienced.

Having said that, I made some changes and added in a few extra steps, the kinds of things that I always just do.

Sewing:

First up, I’m not a fan of facings. They’re too shallow so they are annoying to iron and always flip out.

So for my Laneway dress I decided to fully line to the waist but I used the facing pieces to cut my fusible interfacing.

I had some grand plans initially to try to reduce some bulk at the waist by sewing the darts of both layers together and eliminate having to do any hand sewing at the armhole but in the end I just couldn’t get the steps right in my head so I continued on treating the bodice lining as per the instructions for the facing.

Ready to go!

Making sleeves…

I added in some under-stitching to the pockets to help stop them flipping out. I usually like to sew my pocket bags in a contrast colour for some hidden fun but because these pockets are caught in the waist band I suspected they would gape a tiny bit so I stuck with the self fabric this time around…I did use red overlocking thread 😉

I also under-stitched around the neck, catching the lining to the seam allowance after I attached it. While I was doing this I forgot about the folded collar detail and went a bit too far. The stitching was visible with the lining folded out so I had to unpick back to before the fold to keep it hidden. I’m still glad I did as much as I could to keep the lining sitting nicely at the neck and shoulder.

I always add stay-tape down the center back seam. It helps add some stability before inserting the zipper.

I love that ironing the zipper teeth open is included in the instructions. When I learnt this trick a few years ago it was a game changer.

I was also really happy to see the instruction for machine stitching the facing down over the zipper – You guys know I hate hand stitching and I’m always a little confused when I see instructions to hand stitch the facing/lining to the zipper tape. You will hear me splutter “Why?! You can do that by machine!”

Yay!

All Finished!

I am really REALLY happy with the fit. The release darts fit really nicely under the bust and the C cup is perfect with plenty of room for the ladies.

Next version I’d like to add a bit more flare into the skirt, just a bit. I’ll also put the pockets in lower down and not catch them at the waist. They definitely flare open a little and add to my hips. I love my hips but they don’t need any extra help 😉

The skirt is not full enough for my red petticoat – didn’t stop me trying…

In the back I have a little bit of pooling over my bottom, more than you can see in this photo (hands in pockets helps!) so I’ll do a little sway back adjustment next time – this is a typical fitting issue for me.

The sleeves are great, not too loose, I like the length and they have good movement.

I dug the buttons out of my stash (Yessss! Bonus stash points!) I don’t know where I got them from (maybe a Fabric-a-brac find) but I think they are pretty perfect.

In the end I had to hand stitch the lining at the armhole and waist. It only took one episode of Rick and Morty so not too long and it was good practice I guess…I’ll crack this puzzle, just you wait…

To finish it off my fabric had a really beautiful slevedge that I decided I had to use somewhere on the dress. I ended up keeping the cute saying and then adding my tag over the top of another section so I had an extra chicky and flower.

You can also see the under-stitching to the lining in this photo.

So that’s it!

Do I recommend this pattern? Oh yes. Great drafting, clear instructions – I can’t wait to see the other tester’s versions (I’ve been trying to avoid spoilers and I’m probably last to post due to winter lurgies) and more great patterns from Jennifer Lauren.

THE DEETS:

Pattern – Jennifer Lauren Handmade Laneway Dress, straight size 14, C cup

Fabric – 

Other notions – Invisible zipper, interfacing, buttons

So helpful…

 

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15 thoughts on ““Up, up and away!”, it rhymes with Laneway

  1. Dress looks very, very good.agree with pockets lower also. Love that fabric too. Q? Where do you get your zips from? Zip co-op on FB orders them in bulk and then posts to us. She lives in Perth. Also gets the best cost of Rasant thread. I like the under stitching too. Can you tell me where you got your labels printed ( email please).

  2. I’ve got one of those long “to blog” lists too – oh well!!
    Thanks for the detailed review; I really enjoyed reading it and was hoping as I read that the dress was going to be a success – and woohoo, it looks awesome!

  3. I feel better ( or at least less alone) about my “things to blog” list now! Cute dress in a gorgeous fabric. Great paper cutter tip too, even though I have just discovered a copy shop option where I live.

  4. looks fab do you have any advice for marking out darts ? I have trouble sewing darts, the marker pens you can buy are suppose to stay visible for 1-2 days but seem to disappear after a minute and tailor’s chalk is barely visible?

    • Hi Karen – I use different methods depending on my fabric or dart shape. I think the easiest is to use the spiky tracing wheel with carbon paper. You put the carbon paper coloured side down on the fabric, place you pattern over the top then roll the piked wheel over the dart lines. It transfers little coloured dots to the fabric for you t follow. The other way (that I used for this dress) is to fold the pattern along the dart lines and use a Clover Chao liner to draw the dart lines directly on to the fabric – chaco liners leave a good line of chalk that’s easy to see and come in different colours so you can pick the colour that shows up best. And sometimes I only just use a pin to mark the start of each leg and the apex which some people might think is a bit naughty but it’s fast for straight, simple darts.

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